Art in Antarctica: Media

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Articles about Art in Antarctica

resurgence-p33-sThe Arts: “The Longitudinal Installation: Representing those affected by climate change.” Xavier Cortada. Resurgence, edition 243, page 32-33 (July/August 2007)

Kunsthaus Miami exhibit. Review by Milagros Bello. Published in arte al día
(International Magazine of Contemporary Latin American Art), edition 119, (July 2007).

Bold as Ice:
Miami artist Xavier Cortada finds fresh air at the South Pole.
By Carlos Suarez De Jesus.
Published in the Miami New Times on March 29, 2007.

Cortada reinvents style during Antarctic visit: Art brings awareness to environmental issues
Written by Peter Rejcek.
Published in the Antarctic Sun (Antarctica) on January 21, 2006.

Cold Reality:
Artist Xavier Cortada takes environmental awareness to the South Pole
By Deseraè E. Del Campo
Pubished in Miami Monthly Magazine, April 2007.

The Worth of Water
WorldChanging – Mar 15, 2007
by Katie Kurtz.
Standing in Miami heat picturing the subzero Antarctic seems unimaginable – but this is the premise Xavier Cortada uses to show the neighborly aspect of global warming.

The End Of The Earth Is Closer Than You Might Think,
by Julia Yarbough. Aired on NBC – 6, Miami on March 9, 2007.

Wynwood District – Second Saturday Art Gallery Walk
by Manola Blablablani. Published in Miami Beach 411 on March 12, 2007.

Xavier Cortada: ANTARCTICA
Blue Print Directory, Volume 10, March 2007.

Planting for Life: CultureSurge – Artburst.
by Anne Tschida.
Published in category305 on Thursday, November 9, 2006.

Xavier Cortada to create eco-art in the South Pole

01-21-2007_antarcticsun03-mMiami artist Xavier Cortada will travel to Antarctica from December 28, 2006 to January 9, 2007 to implement a series of art projects sponsored through the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs. In exploring Antarctica, Cortada addresses our interconnectedness to one another and to our planet. “This is an exciting project that will result in a positive and meaningful body of work,” says Kim Silverman, Program Director for the National Science Foundation’sAntarctic Artists and Writer’s Program. “Xavier’s project represents a new and progressive dimension in artistic expression, adding breadth to the Program. I am particularly delighted with the acknowledgement and support that the project brings to the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 movement. Mr. Cortada’s success in reaching large and diverse audiences is significant and will likely inspire people to learn more about IPY and Antarctica—the science, the history, and the importance of the continent.”

It is envisioned that IPY will create long-standing legacies of international research collaborations; capture the world’s imagination in science and 01-21-2007_antarcticsun04-mexploration; and inspire future generations of scientists and engineers.For more information about the U.S. role in IPY visit: www.ipy.gov.)